New Art Forms

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New Art Forms :: New Video

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In New Art Forms blog we’ll try to present most innovative, subversive and controversial artists. The first one is Nigel Tomm. We chose him because of growing controversy all around his art. We’ll take a look at his recent movies, where Nigel Tomm interprets such classical texts as Hamlet, Waiting for Godot or The Catcher in the Rye. Nigel Tomm is also known for his scandalous novel - The Blah Story (up to now 14 volumes are released!), here’s a small quote, i.e., typical The Blah Story sentence: “The blah of the blah was distinctly blah, yet blah was blah sure that it blah from the blah”. So, let’s take a quick look at the artist.

  • Artist: Nigel Tomm
  • Genre: something between new absurdism and neo dada
  • Interests: literature, video, painting

NIGEL TOMM’S MOVIES:

The Catcher in the Rye ( 2008 )

Description from Amazon.com:

This is 75 minutes and 6 seconds of pure blue screen. Nothing less and nothing more. New movie by Nigel Tomm demolishes the boundaries of new absurdism. In 1951, a novel ‘The Catcher in the Rye’ by J. D. Salinger was published. In 2008, a film ‘The Catcher in the Rye’ directed by Nigel Tomm was filmed. Intelligent. Eccentric and subversive. ‘The Catcher in the Rye’ by Nigel Tomm preserves and destroys, it lifts and anchors, it aids and hinders, it’s convenient and frustrating. It has two sides. The most extravagant depths of your wildest imagination are packed in 75 minutes and 6 seconds of pure blue screen. Breathtaking.

Excerpt from the film:

More about the film: IMDB.com or Amazon.com

Waiting for Godot ( 2008 )

Description from Amazon.com:

This is 72 minutes and 5 seconds of pure green screen. Nothing less and nothing more. New movie by Nigel Tomm extends the boundaries of new absurdism. It had to happen sooner or later. Nigel Tomm redefines classical drama one more time. Film adaptation of Samuel Beckett’s ‘Waiting for Godot,’ directed by Nigel Tomm, serves us more than meets the eye. The scene apparently represents the shift into dream state, and it’s the most beautiful and surprising screen of mind. This is not a drama revolution. This is a visual morphine where tragedy is expressed in the purest prospect. It’s just a tiny little line between you and the inside of the screen. It’s all in the head, isn’t it? Now you see it. Now you don’t.

Excerpt from the film:

More about the film: IMDB.com or Amazon.com

Hamlet ( 2008 )

Description from Amazon.com:

This is 63 minutes and 1 second of pure white screen. Nothing less and nothing more. Just shocking new absurdism. Without compromise. Without compare. Nigel Tomm brings his own version of William Shakespeare’s ‘Hamlet.’ Luminous. Sensuous. Iconic. From the moment you touch the play button, the experience begins. Visually stunning, emotionally precise, the extraordinary awaits you. Probably it is one of the most intense, the most radical, the most innovative manifestation of the freedom of thought, of expression and of creation. This is the new ‘Hamlet’ – the most majestic ‘Hamlet’ experience by Nigel Tomm.

Excerpt from the film:

More about the film: IMDB.com or Amazon.com

Oedipus Rex ( 2008 )

Description from Amazon.com:

This is 71 minutes and 20 seconds of pure red screen. Nothing less and nothing more. Just pure new absurdism. Bring lights down and take time to reflect. Absolute tragedy now is built in new aesthetics where freedom of expression allows unique experiences. Transform Sophocle’s ‘Oedipus Rex’ and take your own journey into ‘Oedipus Rex’ film, directed by Nigel Tomm. Again and again. It’s infinite. Shocking. Pure tranquility. Precise harmony of horror. As usual. Nigel Tomm keeps on top of the shape of drama to come.

Excerpt from the film:

More about the film: IMDB.com or Amazon.com

The Brothers Karamazov ( 2008 )

Description from Amazon.com:

This is 73 minutes and 5 seconds of pure magenta screen. Nothing less and nothing more. Just genuine new absurdism. Felt to feel. Enigmatic. Twisted. Absolute morph and absolutely on the edge Nigel Tomm’s film version of Fyodor Dostoevsky’s novel ‘The Brothers Karamazov’ lasts 73 minutes and 5 seconds. 73 minutes and 5 seconds of pure magenta screen. From the outside in, and from the inside out. Unique sense of text visualization. Nigel Tomm is, however, not interested in the meaning of the text. He is interested in the layering and superposition of the text, to serve you exclusive viewpoint of perfectly charged emotions which now are expressed in the purest forms. Be provoked, challenged and inspired.

Excerpt from the film:

More about the film: IMDB.com or Amazon.com

Written by newartforms

May 29, 2008 at 12:36 pm

New Art Forms

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The post about new art forms has been moved here…

Written by newartforms

May 26, 2008 at 4:08 pm

Posted in New Art Forms

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